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September 30, 2014
Your Kid is Going to Make Mistakes

An article I wrote for AYSO's PLAYSOCCER Magazine, Fall 2013:

By Mike Woitalla

Watch the world’s best soccer players, like Lionel Messi or Marta, and you’ll be amazed at how they control and stroke the ball while moving swiftly, feinting with their body, improvising ways to elude defenders game after game — a combination of high skill and creativity.

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April 30, 2014
Why I Ref: A View from the Middle

By 9:30 last Saturday morning I had run more than three miles, earned $20, and had been in the middle of a bunch of kids thoroughly enjoying the beautiful game.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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September 17, 2013
Body Language Lessons from Klinsmann et al.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

A few years ago I arrived at soccer practice in a bad mood for reasons I don't recall. The giggly girls hardly hit a decent pass during the warm-up rondos and I started barking.

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August 01, 2013
Winning's not everything: How to convince parents

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

Coaching young players to increase their chances of excelling at the higher levels can often mean losing games. So how can coaches convince parents not to confuse scorelines with player development progress? Here are a couple of methods that can help coaches show parents how to look for improvement without focusing on wins and losses:

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March 27, 2013
Getting players to pay attention

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

It's perfectly reasonable that children who show up to soccer practice might have a difficult time paying attention when the coach has something to say. They have, after all, spent an entire day at
school listening to adults. And now it's playtime.

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January 19, 2013
Girls vs. Boys: Should coaches communicate differently? (Part 4)

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

A few years ago, I asked a man with plenty of experience, and a fair amount of success, coaching both genders about whether he takes a different approach. He didn't want his quotes attributed, but ...

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January 12, 2013
Girls vs. Boys: A Difference in Social Dynamics? (Part 3)

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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January 02, 2013
Girls vs. Boys: 'It's about how the individual ticks' (Part 2)

In Part 2 of our series we speak with Minnesota coach Julie Eibensteiner, who has coached both genders at the youth and college level for more than a decade.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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December 12, 2012
Girls vs. Boys: Should they be coached differently? (Part 1)

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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November 29, 2012
Strides made; improvement still needed (Steve Swanson Q&A, Part 2)

In September, Steve Swanson coached the USA to the 2012 U-20 Women's World Cup title. A women's college coach since 1990, including the last 13 seasons at University of Virginia, Swanson has also coached in the U.S. national team women's program at the U-16, U-17, U-18 and U-19 levels since 2000. Swanson spoke to us about his U-20 team's victory and the state of women's and girls soccer in the USA.

Interview by Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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October 15, 2012
'Relate to the kids' (Q&A with NSCAA's Ian Barker, Part 1)

Ian Barker became Director of Coaching of the 30,000-member National Soccer Coaches Association of America (NSCAA) in February. A longtime ODP coach, he served as Minnesota Youth Soccer Association Director of Coaching (1997-2007) and spent more than two decades coaching college ball. In Part 1 of our interview we spoke with Barker about youth coaching in America.

Interview by Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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July 12, 2012
Kristine Lilly: Have fun and go after it (Q&A Part 2)

Interview by Mike Woitalla By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

Kristine Lilly, the world record holder for national team appearances with 352, debuted for the USA at age 16 in 1987 and retired in 2010 at age 39. In Part 2 of our interview with the veteran of five World Cups and three Olympic Games, Lilly offers advice for young players and reflects on her youth sports and national team experience.

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July 09, 2012
Kristine Lilly: Good coaches create good memories (Q&A Part 1)

Interview by Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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June 29, 2012
Tim Howard's advice for keepers, parents and coaches

Interview by Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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April 30, 2012
Keys to keeper confidence

By Tim Mulqueen with Mike Woitalla (excerpted from "The Complete Soccer Goalkeeper")

It's perfectly normal to feel nervous before a game, but keepers need to clear their head of negative thoughts. How they go about doing this depends on the individual.

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April 20, 2012
Mia Hamm's advice for girls, parents and coaches

American sports icon Mia Hamm debuted for the U.S. national team at age 15 in 1987. She helped the USA to two World Cup and two Olympic titles. The 158 national team goals she scored before retiring in 2004 remain a world record. We asked Hamm to reflect on her early years and offer advice for coaches, parents and young players.

Interview by Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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December 23, 2011
'Put best coaches at youngest ages' (Q&A with Mustang's Fred Wilson)

The Youth Soccer Insider continues its interview series with youth club leaders by talking with Fred Wilson, the Boys Coaching Director of Northern California's Mustang Soccer, a club-slash-league with nearly 5,000 players under its umbrella.

Interview by Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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October 15, 2011
Patience key when coaching boys in transition (Q&A with Manny Schellscheidt)

For insight into coaching boys* when they hit puberty and how to challenge early-bloomers, we spoke to U.S. Hall of Fame coach Manfred "Manny" Schellscheidt, who had been the technical director of U.S. Soccer's U-14 boys National Identification Program since 1998 and is one of the nation's most experienced youth coaches.

Interview by Mike Woitalla (From Soccer America's YouthSoccerInsider)

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September 13, 2011
Growing pains: Girls face challenge of the 'commotional' years

Age-appropriate coaching has been cited as extremely important in player development. The Youth Soccer Insider begins a series on this topic with a look at the challenges faced by female players as they transition into their teen years by checking in with Tad Bobak, one of the most experienced and successful girls coaches in American youth soccer.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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July 24, 2011
Keeping faith in the volunteer coach (Q&A: AYSO's George Kuntz)

We spoke to George Kuntz, who was recently named AYSO's Player Development Technical Advisor, about the challenges of creating a soccer environment that suits recreational players and those who have the potential for excelling at the highest levels.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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May 05, 2011
The latest coaching recipe

For the second time in six years, the U.S. Soccer Federation has produced a handbook designed to improve youth coaching in America. Claudio Reyna, the USSF's Youth Technical Director, unveiled the "U.S. Soccer Curriculum" in April. It offers specific, age-appropriate guidelines on how to run practice sessions throughout a season. The aim -- besides turning the USA into the soccer world power it certainly has the resources to become -- is to coach children in a way that helps create an American style of play.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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April 30, 2011
Claudio Reyna: 'Coaches should sit down'

For many reasons, Claudio Reyna was the perfect choice to be named U.S. Soccer's Youth Technical Director one year ago.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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April 23, 2011
Field play important for young keepers

Why goalkeepers shouldn't specialize too early ...

By Tim Mulqueen with Mike Woitalla (excerpted from "The Complete Soccer Goalkeeper")

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April 05, 2011
Lecture them not

If being told how to play enabled children to master soccer we'd have an excess of great players and superb teams. The game, it is so obvious, is the best teacher. That's not to say the coaches' choice of words doesn't have an influence. The question is how a coach can communicate with youngsters to help them improve, inspire them, and make their soccer experience an enjoyable one.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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March 26, 2011
Tom Howe: Coaching good soccer takes patience

Tom Howe helped found St. Louis' Scott Gallagher SC in 1976 and coached future stars such as Tim Ream, Brad Davis and Pat Noonan. One of his alums, Cal coach Kevin Grimes, calls Howe "a legend, one of the best youth coaches ever." Last year, after Scott Gallagher merged with Busch SC and Metro United, Howe left and started a new club, Woodson City Rangers. Howe, a St. Louis product himself who starred at SIU-Edwardsville and played in the old NASL, spoke to us for the Youth Soccer Insider's ongoing interview series with leaders of U.S. youth clubs.

Interview by Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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March 13, 2011
Know They Keeper

Coaches must adjust their approach to the individual. Some keepers might need the soft touch to get in the right frame of mind. Others might require a rousing pep talk. Some keepers might fall apart if they are given a direct, honest critique without plenty of compliments to go with it. Others are fine with a harsh, straightforward assessment. So how does the coach know what's best for each individual?

By Tim Mulqueen with Mike Woitalla (excerpted from "The Complete Soccer Goalkeeper")

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March 10, 2011
Tab Ramos: Keep the parents at bay

Tab Ramos, considered one of the USA's most skillful players ever, played for the USA at three World Cups, two Copa Americas, and in the Olympic Games. Two years after retiring in 2002 from a playing career in Spain, Mexico and MLS, he founded the New Jersey youth club NJSA 04. In 2008, he coached the NJSA 04 Gunners to the U-14 U.S. Youth Soccer national title, marking the first national championship for a New Jersey club in two decades.

Interview by Mike Woitalla
(from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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March 02, 2011
Equipping keepers the right way

From head-to-toe: What goalkeepers should wear at practice and games ...

By Tim Mulqueen (from "The Complete Soccer Goalkeeper")

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February 04, 2011
College dreams impact youth play

Ambitions to play college soccer can have a significant impact on a child's path through the youth game -- and the dream of a college soccer scholarship is undoubtedly one reason why parents are willing to spend so much on club ball.

Interview by Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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January 20, 2011
Coping with too many games

The turf war between youth organizations ensures an endless fountain of championships and the tournament industry has made playing three to four games in one weekend a common part of youth soccer. We asked Dr. Dev K. Mishra what coaches can do to when their teams are faced with game overload. Dr. Mishra, the founder of SidelineSportsDoc.com, is an orthopedic surgeon who has served as team doctor at the professional, national team, college and high school level.

Interview by Mike Woitalla (From Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

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December 06, 2010
They scored -- now what?

Goalkeepers react in various ways after they get scored on. Some keepers whack the ball in anger. Some fall to their knees, head in hands. Some scream at their teammates. And some hang forlornly on the net. Whether the keepers realize it or not, these immediate, emotional responses are more than personal reactions. These actions speak loudly to the keepers' own teammates and to their opponents.

By Tim Mulqueen with Mike Woitalla

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October 20, 2010
Crucial for Coaches: Injury management know-how

To coach young children where I live, I had to get licenses from a couple of coaching courses that totaled five days of instruction. We were taught all sorts of drills -- a few of which resembled soccer-playing -- and were given some useful tips. Like keeping plastic bags in your coaching bag in case you need to pick up dog poo before practice.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America Magazine's Youth Soccer Insider)

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October 19, 2010
Champion coach Albertin Montoya puts winning in perspective

On a sunny September Sunday, Coach Albertin Montoya watched his Gold Pride players, including the magnificent Brazilian Marta and U.S. world champion Tiffeny Milbrett, celebrate the WPS championship after a 4-0 win over Philadelphia

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America Magazine's Youth Soccer Insider)

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August 30, 2010
How adults can 'teach' kids by playing along

One of the best ways for adults to coach children is to play along with them.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America Magazine's Youth Insider)

It's certainly no secret that children learn more from what they see than from what they are told. Just try explaining how to strike a ball without demonstrating.

Whether it’s at a practice scrimmage or a casual kickaround, children playing with and against adults pick up all sorts of soccer skill and knowledge.

But, of course, there are risks when children play a sport with persons three times as big, and the adults must play without causing injuries or invading on the children's playtime.

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October 06, 2009
Why is scrimmage dessert?

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America Magazine's Youth Insider)

It seems to be conventional wisdom that scrimmaging - letting children actually play soccer - is something that should happen only at the end of practice. It's promised to them like a dessert, the reward for eating the broccoli.


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September 20, 2009
For Kids Only ...

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America Magazine's Youth Insider)

This column is for the kids. Adults can stop reading now

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September 01, 2009
The Internet Impact

The game will always be played on the field, but everything that leads up to it has become easier thanks to high technology.

By Mike Woitalla (from the September 2009 issue of Soccer America)

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July 25, 2009
Clicking for Kicks

To develop skills and master the game, the next best thing to playing is to watch. But a common lament among American coaches, one I've heard even from U.S. national team coaches, is their young players don't watch enough soccer.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America Magazine's Youth Insider)

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May 20, 2009
Barcelona's approach to youth development

Two years ago, while visiting Spain, I looked into to its approach to youth development. Since then, Spain has won the 2008 European Championship and Barcelona won the 2009 UEFA Champions League.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America Magazine's Youth Insider)

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May 15, 2009
The Girls Game - Higher Expectations

Anson Dorrance, the USA's first world championship coach, and Pia Sundhage, its latest, share their views on how American girls soccer can keep getting better.

By Mike Woitalla (from the May issue of Soccer America)

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April 02, 2009
Encouraging the Pass ... When the Time is Right

One of the biggest mistakes youth coaches can make is to force a passing game on children too early. So how can coaches encourage passing without impeding their players' development?

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider.)

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February 20, 2009
Field Play Makes Better Keepers

Is the USA's ability to produce great goalkeepers threatened by early specialization?

By Mike Woitalla (from the February issue of Soccer America)

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February 02, 2009
Getting kids to play on their own

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider, Jan. 15, 2008)

No one denies that children who want to excel at soccer should play the game in addition to their team's practices and games, but today's children have less unscheduled time than previous generations and more diversions. Getting them to choose soccer over other options -- whether it be Guitar Hero or Webkinz - can require prodding from the parents.


Here are some methods that parents and coaches can use to encourage children to play on their own, and games they'll enjoy while improving their skills:

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January 10, 2009
Getting kids to play on their own

My article in PLAYSOCCER Magazine on getting kids to player soccer on their own can be read HERE.
--Mike Woitalla




November 20, 2008
The Delight of Coaching Your Own Child

By Mike Woitalla from AYSO's PLAYSOCCER Magazine.

It's one of the greatest delights of parenthood. I don't recall it mentioned in any of the guide books while preparing for fatherhood or that it came up in the words of encouragement from friends or family. It's the magic of seeing the world through your child's eyes.

Spend a little time with a youngster, and you're fielding questions about the sky, the moon and the stars that you may not have thought about for years. Watch the eyes of children when they play with a dog, see a fire truck, or marvel at the way soap bubbles soar and pop.

Put together a train set, build Lego cities, goof around with dolls and stuffed animals. At some point it will hit. You feel like a child again. You're rediscovering joy and magnificence where you long ago forgot they existed.

And you get to play ball! If you're lucky, you might coach your child's soccer team.

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October 14, 2008
Why Sideline Screaming Can Stifle Your Child's Game

By Mike Woitalla from AYSO's PLAYSOCCER Magazine.

Imagine you're undertaking a fairly difficult task: assembling a piece of furniture with hieroglyphic instructions, filling out IRS Form 4562 on April 14, or standing on the highest rungs of a ladder painting the crown moulding in your living room with 14-foot ceilings. Think it would help if someone yelled at you during the process? Of course not.

Yet when a child tries to control a bouncing ball in a crowd of other kids, adults often believe it's perfectly acceptable to scream "advice." The shouting at America's soccer fields is so epidemic one wonders if adults ever reflect on their behavior. Adults who would never shout at children while they're enjoying the playground, drawing in a coloring book, or rearranging their dollhouse, loudly instruct from the sidelines without hesitation.

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August 01, 2008
Making keepers feel unbeatable

Olympics mark Coach Mulqueen's fourth world championship with U.S. goalies.

By Mike Woitalla, Soccer America

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June 20, 2008
How the screaming hurts

What makes the epidemic of sideline shouting particularly egregious is that the instructions are usually misguided.

By Mike Woitalla (Soccer America Magazine, June 2008)

What better venue for an endless array of amusement and bemusement than the youth soccer field? Much is predictable, like the adult sideline behavior, but the unexpected never ceases.

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April 30, 2008
The Right Time to Slide Tackle

By Claudio Reyna

A well-executed slide tackle robs the opponent of the ball. In the best-case scenario, the defending player ends up with the ball at his feet, jumps up, and launches a counterattack.

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March 04, 2008
Coaching Your Own Children

Clearly, coaching your son or daughter isn't easy. If you are able to find an appropriate balance between encouragement and pressure, however, it can be a wonderfully rewarding experience.

Tony DiCicco, who coached the U.S. women to the 1999 Women's World Cup title, has also coached his own children at the youth level. He addressed the challenges and provided advice in Soccer America's Youth Insider.

Read more...



February 25, 2008
A Different Approach

A replica of the French federation's youth development program may not be feasible in the USA, but some key aspects of the system are worth considering.

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer Magazine, February, 2008 issue).

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January 29, 2008
Total Soccer for Children

When should coaches start assigning specific positions to young players?

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America Magazine, January 2008 issue)

We see it so often one wonders whether American youth coaches are getting their soccer advice from Garry Kasparov.

"Kids come up to the halfway line," says Sam Snow, U.S. Youth Soccer's Director of Coaching Education, "and actually balance themselves not to go past it, because they suddenly realize, 'Oh my god, there's the line that I'm not supposed to go past.' Their arms are swinging, it's almost like they're on a balance beam or something."

It's a prime example of overcoaching - prevalent even though it's generally agreed that pickup games or street soccer spawned the world's greatest players.

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December 05, 2007
'Artistry and Potential'

"At a youth soccer game you'll probably hear parents and coaches on the sidelines yelling, 'Pass the ball! Pass the ball!' ... When we continually tell our young players to pass the ball, we're not allowing them to develop their full potential, especially those who have the ability to take their opponents on and beat them one-on-one. As a result, we run the risk of diminishing a player's artistry and potential."

-- Tony DiCicco, who coached the U.S. women's national team to the 1996 Olympic Gold Medal and the 1999 Women's World Cup title. (from "Catch Them Being Good: Everything You Need to Know to Successfully Coach Girls.")




November 11, 2007
Getting players to juggle

By Mike Woitalla (from Soccer America's Youth Soccer Insider)

Perhaps the greatest challenge facing youth soccer coaches is getting their players to play ball on their own.

For sure, the first step is making practices so much fun that players fall in love with the sport. But children today have such a vast variety of pastime options that even those who are passionate about their soccer may need prodding to get the soccer ball out.

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November 01, 2007
Improving skills on your own

Excerpted from "More Than Goals: The journey from backyard games to World Cup competition" By Claudio Reyna with Mike Woitalla.


A player can always improve his fitness by working out hard. He can comprehend certain tactics by studying the game. But how far he goes will be determined mainly by how well he has mastered ball skills. Those are acquired by playing, day after day, year after year.

A player who really wants to excel will spend as much time as possible playing small-sided games when he has playmates, and juggling and kicking against the wall when he's on his own.

I spent a lot of time hitting the ball against the side of the house when I was a growing up. If my mother complained about the noise, I'd hop down the retaining wall at the end of our property to the office-building parking lot.

I'd use that wall -- hitting the ball with both feet, seeing how long I could return the wall's passes without losing control. I found out later that so many pros spent lots of their childhood doing that.

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October 23, 2007
Tips from a Brazilian great

In an episode from UEFA's "Training Ground" series, Brazilian playmaker Kaka, who plays his club ball for AC Milan, gives a lesson on the defense-splitting pass in a three-minute video you can see HERE.




August 14, 2007
Capitalizing from the Corner

Excerpted from "More Than Goals: The journey from backyard games to World Cup competition" By Claudio Reyna with Mike Woitalla.


The corner kick is an incredible opportunity to score, and it's something players can practice on their own, because unlike a cross that you're hitting during the run of play, the corner kick is always taken from the same distance, give or take the few yards by which the width of fields varies from stadium to stadium.

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July 12, 2007
Intelligent Crossing

Excerpted from "More Than Goals: The journey from backyard games to World Cup competition" By Claudio Reyna with Mike Woitalla

One reason so many crosses don't end up producing a scoring chance is because players too often send them in blindly. They figure that if they're on the wing, just whip the ball into the middle.

Even in the pros, you see this time after time. A player moves down the wing and launches a cross even if there are no teammates in front of the goal. If you haven't got a forward waiting for the cross, then you've got to look for other options, like turning back and looking for a midfielder.

In other instances, when teammates are moving in for a cross, the crosser hammers a ball without aiming. A cross is still a pass, and the most dangerous ones are those that fly into the path of a teammate.

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May 08, 2007
The Value of Juggling

Excerpted from "More Than Goals: The journey from backyard games to World Cup competition" By Claudio Reyna with Mike Woitalla

Sometimes kids ask, "Why should I juggle? You never do it in a game."

Juggling trains you to become comfortable with the ball. To tap the ball in the air over and over means you're hitting the sweet spot. How can a player volley a ball that comes flying across the field if he can't connect well on a ball he's knocking a few feet or inches in the air?

Just as juggling with the foot helps a player acquire the skills for trapping and striking the ball, juggling off the thigh helps him become comfortable with bringing down the ball at that height. Remember - a player can't dictate how a ball is going to arrive during a game.

Besides training foot-eye coordination, juggling is a great way to work on balance. Standing on one foot and hitting the ball with the other. That's just what a player does when he shoots, passes, or traps the ball. And good overall balance is a key ingredient to being a superb athlete.

To this day, I love watching a videotape of Diego Maradona juggling the ball with every part of his body except his arms and hands. It's as if he has a spell over the ball.

One reason juggling is so much fun is that you improve so quickly. First, you try to keep the ball up a couple times. When you can do it 10 times, you try for 20. Then 50, and so on. Do it enough, and you can juggle the ball 100 or 1,000 times.

If you can juggle 20 times with your right foot, try 10 with your left foot. Alternating feet when you juggle is excellent practice. Juggling is the greatest thing players can do to work on their skills.

Being a good juggler doesn't necessarily make you a great player, but I've never seen a great player who's not a good juggler. I think that tells you something.




March 27, 2007
YSF.com Coaching Course: Lesson 1

When children first become involved in organized soccer, the coach's job is simply to create an environment that gives the children a chance to enjoy the sport. It's such a wonderful sport that setting up goals and letting them play usually does the trick.




March 24, 2007
'Play first, win later'

By Mike Woitalla
(From the October 2006 issue of Soccer America Magazine)

Claudio Reyna, the veteran of four World Cup teams played top-flight soccer in Europe longer than any American in history.

Born and raised in New Jersey, he was coached first by his father, Miguel, who played pro ball in Argentina.

''My father's coaching philosophy was, 'Learn to play first, learn to win later,''' says Reyna in his book, More Than Goals: The journey from backyard games to World Cup competition. ''He would rather us play well and lose than go out and play ugly and win.''

When he and his teammates were about 10, Claudio says his father encouraged them to string passes together and heaped praise upon them when they were able to keep possession. He didn't mind if they lost to teams that depended on booting the ball to a big boy up front.

''Playing possession soccer would pay off in the long run, even if it doesn't get results at the youth level,'' Reyna says. ''He knew that when players advanced to higher levels, the direct, long-ball approach would become ineffective, because it's a predictable strategy and it becomes especially futile when the team no longer has a size advantage.''

In the pros and for the USA, Reyna has played attacking and defensive midfielder, on both flanks, on the frontline, and as an outside back. That versatility started early.

''My dad had us switch positions all the time,'' Reyna says. ''A lot of star players are only used in the center during their youth career. When they join a team that already has players to fill that role, they can't adjust to another position, and their career comes to an early end.''




Remember, It's Playtime

Taking the drilling and screaming out of youth soccer will make the game more enjoyable and create better players.

By Mike Woitalla, Soccer America Magazine

Let's take the approach so many adults bring to youth soccer to other children's activities.

Take a bunch of 6-year-olds to the playground, but don't let them scamper off to explore the different structures. Make them all line up and wait patiently to take turns on the monkey bars. If one of them wanders off toward the swings, scream at him.

Be sure to tell them exactly how they should climb. Yell at the slow ones to go faster. While they're hanging from a bar, shout at them to ''grab the next bar!''

Read more...





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